Eugene Corporon

Eugene Migliaro Corporon is the conductor of the Wind Symphony and Regents Professor of Music at the University of North Texas. As Director of Wind Studies he guides all aspects of the program, including the masters and doctoral degrees in Wind Conducting. Mr. Corporon is a graduate of California State University, Long Beach and Claremont Graduate University. His performances have drawn praise from colleagues, composers and music critics alike. Mr. Corporon has held positions at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, Michigan State University, the University of Northern Colorado, the University of Wisconsin, and California State University, Fullerton. His ensembles have performed at the Midwest International Band and Orchestra Clinic, Southwestern Music Educators National Conference, Texas Music Educators Association Clinic/Convention, Texas Bandmasters Association Convention/Clinic, International Trumpet Guild Conference, International Clarinet Society Convention, North American Saxophone Alliance Conference, Percussive Arts Society International Convention, International Horn Society Conference, National Wind Ensemble Conference, College Band Directors National Association Conference, Japan Band Clinic, and the Conference for the World Association of Symphonic Bands and Ensembles. Having recorded over 600 works, including many premieres and commissions, his groups have released 100 recordings on the Toshiba/EMI, Klavier, Mark, CAFUA, Donemus, Soundmark, GIA, Albany, Naxos, and Centaur labels. These recordings, two of which have appeared on the Grammy nomination ballot, are aired regularly on radio broadcasts throughout Asia, Europe, and the Americas. Mr. Corporon maintains an active guest-conducting schedule and is in demand as a conductor and teacher throughout the world. He is Past President of the College Band Directors National Association and a past board member of the World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensembles International Board. He has been honored by the American Bandmasters Association and by Phi Beta Mu with invitations to membership. Mr. Corporon, a frequent guest conductor at the Showa University of Music in Kawasaki City, Japan, has also served as a visiting conductor at the Julliard School, the Interlochen World Center for Arts Education and the Aspen Music Festival and School. He is also the principal conductor of the Lone Star Wind Orchestra, a professional group made up of musicians from the Dallas and Fort Worth metroplex. He is co-host with Barry Green on The Inner Game of Music video, which focuses on overcoming mental obstacles and achieving one’s full potential as a performer. He also appears with James Jordan on the DVD, The Anatomy of Conducting. He is co-author of the book Teaching Music Through Performance in Band that is published in nine volumes by GIA Publications. This series includes eighteen sets of Resource Recordings by the North Texas Wind Symphony. The Teaching Music Project emphasizes the importance of comprehensive conceptual learning in the music-making process as well as the value of performing music of artistic significance. Professor Corporon is a recipient of the International Grainger Society Distinctive Contribution Medallion as well as the Phi Beta Mu International Band Conductor of the Year Award. He has also received the Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia National Citation for advancing the cause of music in America, the University of North Texas Student Government Association Honor Professor Award for teaching excellence, student rapport, and scholarly publications, the American School Band Directors Association A. A. Harding Award for making significant and lasting contributions to the school band movement, and the California State University, Long Beach, College of Fine Arts and Department of Music Distinguished Alumni Awards. He is grateful to many people for their guidance and inspiration in his life. Among them are Charles Yates, Robert Reynolds, Benton Minor, Don Wilcox, Larry Maxey, Jack Hopkins, Frederick Fennell, Barry Green, James Jordan, and Carolyn Corporon.

Thomas Fraschillo

Thomas V. Fraschillo, DMA, has served as a catalyst and mentor for members of the teaching profession for 50 years. His high standards of performance have had a sustained influence on ensembles at every level, and his performances serve as models in both the professional or academic arena. Through his recordings, The Music of Luigi Zaninelli and The University of Southern Mississippi Wind Ensemble LIVE IN ITALY (recorded in Italy), and his publishing, conducting, and lecturing in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia, he is considered an international musician/scholar. His publications, translations from the original Italian of Alessandro Vessella’s Studi di strumentazione (Instrumentation Studies), and La Tecnica dell’orchestra contemporanea (The Technique of Contemporary Orchestration) by Alfredo Casella and Vittorio Mortari, both published by BMG Ricordi, Milan, have put his name in libraries of the entire English speaking world. As a writer/scholar Dr. Fraschillo is a contributing editor to the American Grove Dictionary, 2nd Edition and serves as a frequent conductor and lecturer in Italy. His most recent appearances in Italy have been with La Banda dell’esercito/The Italian Army Band in Rome. One of his most significant engagements with them signaled a very important milestone for the Italian Army in that Dr. Fraschillo was the first American-born conductor to have been invited to appear in a public performance by what is considered Italy’s most prestigious military concert band. The concert with Dr. Fraschillo conducting was the opening concert of the International Festival in Spoleto, “The Festival of Two Worlds, Festival dei due mondi.” His appearance was enormously significant for conductors of bands in that the opening performance featured such international artists as Gian Carlo Menotti, the renowned composer, the Orchestra and Giuseppe Verdi Chorus of Milan, and the Italian actress, Claudia Cardinale. Finally, in Italy Dr. Fraschillo often serves as a member of the judging panel for many international festivals, most notably the Concorso Internazionale di Composizione “R. Marenco” di Novi Ligure, and the Concorso Internazionale di Composizione Originale per Banda di Corciano.

Aside from Dr. Fraschillo’s work in Europe, he is often engaged throughout the continents of Asia, and Australia. The Melbourne, Australia, Summer Youth Music Program has invited Dr. Fraschillo to be their guest conductor for their summer session for five years. In addition, the Australian Band and Orchestra Directors Association has invited him to lecture and to adjudicate at their large ensemble festivals. Dr. Fraschillo’s other work in the Pacific Rim includes having served as clinician and guest conductor of the Central Armed Forces Band in Singapore and as conductor of the Singapore All-College Band sponsored by the Wind Band Association of Singapore. In 2009 and 2010 Dr. Fraschillo served as Artistic Director for the weeklong Winter Band Festival at Disney, Hong Kong.

Dr. Fraschillo has recently been recognized by election to the National Band Association’s Hall of Fame of Distinguished Conductors, a distinct honor that recognizes his lengthy career as a public school, university, and professional conductor.

Dr. Fraschillo devoted a significant amount of his career to the education of young people in Mississippi. For example, his ten-year tenure at Meridian High School was highlighted by a performance at the Midwest Clinic in Chicago, the nation’s oldest and most prestigious music event for wind and string educators. Dr. Fraschillo’s Meridian students obtained successes not before reached, for he taught and helped place the first African-American students in the Mississippi All-State Band. Not only were they among the first minority members, but they were also the first African-Americans to attain the very highest positions in the group.

Dr. Fraschillo has attained a significant level in the realm of international leadership in that he serves as a Past President and Secretary-Treasurer of the prestigious American Bandmasters Association, Past President of the world’s largest organization for band directors, the National Band Association, and President of the CBDNA Southern Division.

Mark Camphouse

A product of the rich cultural life of Chicago, composer-conductor Mark Camphouse was born in Oak Park, Illinois in 1954. He received undergraduate and graduate degrees in music from Northwestern University where he studied composition with Alan Stout, conducting with John P. Paynter, and trumpet with Vincent Cichowicz. A scholarship from the Civic Orchestra of Chicago enabled Camphouse to study trumpet privately for two years with the late, legendary Chicago Symphony Principal Trumpet Emeritus, Adolph Herseth.

Camphouse began composing at an early age, with the Colorado Philharmonic premiering his First Symphony when he was 17. His 30 published works for wind band have received widespread critical acclaim and are performed frequently in the US and abroad, in such prestigious venues as Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, Orchestra Hall-Chicago, Royal Albert Hall-London, and conferences of the World Association for Symphonic Bands and Ensembles, College Band Directors National Association, National Association for Music Education, American Bandmasters Association, Texas Bandmasters Association, and the Midwest International Band and Orchestra Clinic. Principal commissions include those by the William D. Revelli Foundation, The US Army Band, The US Marine Band, Northshore Concert Band, and some of America’s finest high school, college-university, and community bands.

Mr. Camphouse has served as guest conductor, lecturer, and clinician in 43 states, Canada, Europe, and China. He was elected to membership in the American Bandmasters Association in 1999 and has served as founding coordinator of the National Band Association Young Composer Mentor Project since 2000. He conceived and edited the unique 4-volume book series for GIA Publications, Composers on Composing for Band. His 5th book with GIA Publications (Whatsoever Things … The Life and Teachings of John P. Paynter) was published in 2014.

The 2016-2017 academic year marks his 39th year of full-time teaching in higher education. In 2006, Professor Camphouse joined the faculty of George Mason University (Fairfax, Virginia) where he serves as conductor of the wind symphony and teaches courses in composition and conducting. Other principal artistic, teaching, and administrative positions have included serving as Music Director and Conductor of the New Mexico Music Festival at Taos Symphony Orchestra, Associate Director and Music Division Head of the Virginia Governor’s School for the Arts, Acting Dean of Music of New World School for the Arts in Miami, and Interim Director of the George Mason University School of Music.

Professor Camphouse attained regional finalist status in the prestigious White House Fellowship Competition in 1993. In 2002, he received an Outstanding Faculty Award sponsored by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, the Commonwealth’s highest honor for faculty at Virginia’s colleges and universities for demonstrated excellence in teaching, research, and public service. In 2011, Camphouse received the Kappa Kappa Psi Distinguished Service to Music Award in recognition of, and appreciation for valuable contributions to the growth and development of the modern college/university band in the field of composition. In December 2015, Camphouse received the Outstanding Contributor to Music Award from Phi Beta Mu International Bandmasters Fraternity during the Midwest International Band and Orchestra Clinic in Chicago. Mark Camphouse has been married to Elizabeth Ann Curtis (Executive Director of Mason’s Potomac Arts Academy) since 1982. They have twin daughters, Beth and Briton.